What Is It Wednesday: June 29 REVEALED – 140 year old bagel

“What Is It Wednesday” Revealed – every Wednesday we post an unusual artifact from our collections and encourage viewers to guess the object.

Description:

Members of the Urbach family of Sutton, Nebraska, are said to have brought bagels with them on their ocean voyage from Germany to the United States in the 1870s. Although the Urbachs consumed large numbers of bagels during the trip, a few survived to reach Nebraska and become family heirlooms.

See the 1967 Nebraska History article “Our Parents Were Russian Germans” by William Urbach.

 

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What Is It Wednesday: June 29 – Crusty old circle

Welcome to “What Is It Wednesday”!

We’ll post a photo of an unusual artifact from our collections every Wednesday morning. Post your guess in the comments, and share when you figure out what it is!

We’ll identify the artifact and its uses on Thursday morning.29Jun_Bottom29Jun_Top

 

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Marker Monday: Chadron-Chicago Cowboy Race

Welcome to Marker Monday! Each Monday we will feature one of Nebraska’s hundreds of historical markers. If you’d like to see a specific marker featured, send an email to kylie.kinley@nebraska.gov.

The Chadron-Chicago Cowby Race ended 123 years ago today. Some of the events surrounding the race included animal rights activism and the myth of the Wild West.

ChadronCowboyRace

Location:

150-198 E 2nd St, Chadron, Dawes County, Nebraska; 42.830997, -102.9994

Marker Text:

America’s longest horse race began here June 13, 1893. The 1,000 mile race ended June 27 in Chicago at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. The race apparently was the idea of Chadron jokester John G. Maher. Seven of nine riders finished, some traveling up to ninety miles a day. Nebraska badman “Doc” Middleton was an entrant. John Berry won, riding Sandy and Poison, but was disqualified for having prior knowledge of the route. Chadron officials declared Joe Gillespie the winner.

Read on/ Bibliography:

William E. Deahl, Jr., “The Chadron-Chicago 1,000-Mile Cowboy Race,” Nebraska History 53 (1972): 166-193.

The ride was designed to pit skilled Western horsemen against each other over a one thousand-mile route spanning the three states of Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois. This article presents the planning, the promotion, the opposition, and the story of the actual race.

 

 

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Flashback Friday: Rare Photos from a Troubled Time Featured in Newest NSHS Book

000-RedCloud-Dustjacket-2.inddLast Days of Red Cloud Agency: Rare Photos from a Troubled Time

In the final year of his life, longtime NSHS curator Thomas R. Buecker investigated and wrote about a newly-uncovered collection of photographs which illustrate a major turning point in the history of Nebraska and the Great Plains. The NSHS recently published the resulting book, Last Days of Red Cloud Agency: Peter T. Buckley’s Photograph Collection, 1876-1877.

The years 1876-77 were a period of traumatic change for the Native peoples of the northern Plains. The Great Sioux War marked the end of their traditional lifestyle and the beginning of their restriction to reservations. Last Days of Red Cloud Agency presents a collection of photographs of the Oglala Lakota and Arapaho Indians at northwestern Nebraska’s Red Cloud Agency, of the agency itself, and of other sites and landmarks in the vicinity.

The collection was assembled by Peter T. Buckley, who worked at Camp (later Fort) Robinson, Nebraska, during those crucial years. Some of these views are already familiar to historians, but many others are published here for the first time. Together they tell a story of a land and culture in transition.

Historian and author Paul Hedren says that Buecker “was a master story-teller whose unique focus was the Pine Ridge Country and Fort Robinson. He had a sharp eye for detail and especially reveled in the minute dimensions of that grand old fort, in the sagas of Crazy Horse, Red Cloud, and Spotted Tail, or here in the remarkable tale of Camp Robinson and Red Cloud Agency in their glory days. The diverse array of images associated with this particular narrative are themselves a treasure. Piecing the story of collectors and this striking group of photographs, many of them unpublished, was Tom’s forte. Last Days of Red Cloud Agency is both a unique contribution to Nebraska history and a fitting final tribute to a sorely missed historian and friend.”

Major J.W. Paddock entertains a group at his home for breakfast. Around the table from right to left are an unidentified man, Frank Ransom, Spotted Tail, Major Paddock, Dove Eye (Spotted Tail's daughter), and Mrs. Spotted Tail.

Major J.W. Paddock entertains a group at his home for breakfast.
Around the table from right to left are an unidentified man, Frank Ransom, Spotted Tail, Major Paddock, Dove Eye (Spotted Tail’s daughter), and Mrs.
Spotted Tail.

Buckley’s photograph collection is owned by Larry Ness of Yankton, South Dakota, who generously allowed the NSHS to scan and publish the photos. Publication costs were provided by the Ronald K. and Judith M. Stolz Parks Publishing Fund established at the Nebraska State Historical Society Foundation.

The 268-page hardcover book is available for $29.95 ($26.95 for NSHS members) through the NSHS Landmark Stores, Amazon.com, and select local bookstores. For more information, visit nebraskahistory.org or call 402-471-4754

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What Is It Wednesday – June 22 REVEALED – Delusion Mousetrap

Every Wednesday, we post a photo of an unusual artifact from our collections. Thanks to everyone who guessed!

While this particular artifact is not on exhibit, please visit the newly-renovated Nebraska History Museum at 15th and P Streets to engage with more fascinating Nebraska History.

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11661-1 Delusion Mousetrap

Invented by John H. Morris of Seward. Morris patented the trap in 1876. He sold his patent in 1877, and several companies manufactured the Delusion and similar traps. Today, the Victor Woodstream Corporation of Pennsylvania continues to produce a trap based on the Delusion’s design.

See Nebraska History, Summer 1997, Vol. 78 No. 2 “The Delusion of John Morris: A Better Mouse Trap and its Makers” by David Drummond

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What Is It Wednesday: June 22 – Wood and metal doohicky with holes

Welcome to “What Is It Wednesday”!

We’ll post a photo of an unusual artifact from our collections every Wednesday morning. Post your guess in the comments, and share when you figure out what it is!

We’ll identify the artifact and its uses on Thursday morning.June22.Front

 

Jun22.Back

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Marker Monday: St. John’s

Welcome to Marker Monday! Each Monday we will feature one of Nebraska’s hundreds of historical markers. If you’d like to see a specific marker featured, send an email to kylie.kinley@nebraska.gov.

St.Johns

Location:

101-199 N John St, Jackson, Dakota County, Nebraska

Marker Text:

About 1 1\2 miles north of this spot is the abandoned site of “Old St. John’s,”one of the first towns established in Dakota County. The townsite was settled on June 2, 1856, by the Father Trecy Colony–sixty people, with eighteen ox-drawn covered wagons. The site was surveyed and platted June 24, 1856, and the town was named St. John’s, in honor of St. John the Baptist. The colony was led by Father Jeremiah Trecy, a young Catholic priest from the Garryowen Parish near Dubuque, Iowa. Consisting mostly of Irish immigrants, it constituted the first Catholic parish in Nebraska. The town of St. John’s grew rapidly and by 1858 it had two hundred inhabitants. In 1860 Father Trecy went to Washington seeking permission to establish a mission among the Ponca Indians. Meanwhile the Civil War began. Father Trecy became an army chaplain, and never returned to his beloved colony. In the early sixties, the Missouri River began to threaten St. John’s. The people began moving their buildings to the new town of Jackson. By 1866 all buildings were gone and the townsite was abandoned. The site of St. John’s still exists as a symbol of courage and hope and of the religious faith of a dedicated people.

Bibliography / Read On:

Search results for “St. John’s” on nebraskahistory.org

 

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Flashback Friday: Our People, Our Land, Our Images Indigenous Photography Exhibition Now Open

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Opportunities to view indigenous peoples through the eyes of indigenous photographers are rare and recent. “Our People, Our Land, Our Images,” on display June 16-August 11 at the Nebraska History Museum in Lincoln, presents the works of three generations of indigenous photographers from the North America, South America, the Middle East, and New Zealand. They include newly-discovered, nineteenth-century trailblazers, well established contemporary practitioners, and emerging photographers from the next generation.

This powerful exhibit is on loan to the Nebraska History Museum for only six weeks, so hurry and experience it before it moves on to its next destination!

The fifty-one works in the exhibition tell their stories through differing photographic approaches. Some are straightforward documentary shots. Others are altered images that combine overlays and collage. The images stand united  in exploring their creators’ connections to their land, community, and traditions.

Artists’ statements accompanying the exhibition convey a variety of indigenous voices and concerns. The twenty-six artists in the exhibition include Cherokee Jennie Ross Cobb, the earliest known female Native American photographer. Two images by Cherokee photographer Shan Goshorn interpret women from two Nebraska-area tribes: Pawnee and Otoe-Missouria.

The exhibition offers an open-ended experience that asks audiences to think about how the camera in the hands of indigenous peoples becomes a tool with the power to confront and analyze stereotypes, politics, and histories. The exhibit also demonstrates the longevity and continuing vitality of native photographic traditions.

A free film series accompanies the exhibit on tour through ExhibitsUSA, a national program of Mid-America Arts Alliance.  Short film screenings will include free popcorn and a post-film discussion led by a special guest from the community.  Dates for the Sunday 2:00 p.m. film events include:

July 24 “Silent Tears” (1997, 28 min. Narrative) Director/Producer Shirley Cheechoo, Cree

July 31 “How People Got Fire” (2009, 16 min. Animated) Screenplay/Director: Daniel Janke, Animation design: Christopher Auchter, Haida

August  7 Experimental Short Films by Shelley Niro, Mohawk

The Nebraska History Museum at 131 Centennial Mall North, Lincoln, is open to the public free of charge. Hours are 9:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Monday-Friday and 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Closed state holidays. More at www.nebraskahistory.org or call 402-471-4782.

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NSHS Exhibits Artist Jennifer Graham uses a light meter to make sure none of the lights for the new exhibit “Our People, Our Land, Our Images” will be too hot and damage the photographs. The exhibit opened June 16 and will run until August 11.

MORE ABOUT THE EXHIBIT

Guest curator Veronica Passalacqua of The C. N. Gorman Museum at the University of California, Davis, originally organized this exhibition in conjunction with a conference for international indigenous photographers held at the Museum. For the past fifteen years, Passalacqua has been active in the field of Native North American art as a writer, curator, and scholar. Most recently, she facilitated the donation/repatriation of a significant private Lakota collection of artifacts to the Buechel Memorial Lakota Museum, Pine Ridge Reservation.  Previous curatorial work includes exhibitions at the Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford; the Navajo Nation Museum, Window Rock; and the Barbican Art Gallery, London.

ExhibitsUSA sends more than 25 exhibitions on tour to more than 100 small- and mid-sized communities every year. Mid-America is the oldest nonprofit regional arts organization in the United States. More information is available at www.maaa.org and www.eusa.org.

— Lynne Ireland, NSHS Deputy Director

 

 

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What Is It Wednesday: June 15 – Wig Mold

Welcome to “What is It Wednesday – REVEALED”! Thanks to everyone who guessed!

 

June 22 Side CJune 22 Side B

 

 

 

 

 

June 22 Sida A11458-1 Wig Mold

Hinged door on side allows interior to be storage for wig care tools.

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What Is It Wednesday: June 15 – Black round thingy with hinges, hooks, and clamp

Welcome to “What Is It Wednesday”!

We’ll post a photo of an unusual artifact from our collections every Wednesday morning. Post your guess in the comments, and share when you figure out what it is!

We’ll identify the artifact and its uses on Thursday morning.

 

June 22 Side CJune 22 Sida A June 22 Side B

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