Monthly Archives: August 2011

Hedwig Rosenberg’s Persian Lamb Coat

11588-263 (photograph at left). The Nebraska History museum has a collection of clothing that spans almost 150 years. Some of these items have important stories to tell. Here is one of those stories. In the early years of the 1930s, … Continue reading

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The Value of a Simple Work Shirt

Think about the clothes you save–what are they?  Chances are your family saves things like wedding dresses, christening gowns, military uniforms and other fancy or formal attire.  These get handed down for a few generations (maybe) and sometimes are eventually … Continue reading

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Souvenir Spoons

Collecting souvenir spoons became a popular hobby for Americans in the late 1800s. Wealthy tourists visiting Europe brought home these mementos marked with the names of foreign cities and famous landmarks they had seen. The Omaha Daily Bee on May … Continue reading

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Pests on the Plains: The Potato Bug

Solomon D. Butcher’s photograph from about 1905 depicted boys working in a sweet potato field at the State Industrial School in Kearney. NSHS RG2608-749 (at left). With the sole exception of grasshoppers, perhaps the most hated insects to afflict the … Continue reading

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International Religious Leader Visits Nebraska

The Bahá’í Faith was founded by Bahá’u’lláh in 19th-century Persia. `Abdu’l-Bahá Abbas (1844-1921), eldest son of Bahá’í founder Bahá’u’lláh, became the sole interpreter of his father’s teaching after Bahá’u’lláh’s death. Portrait of `Abdu’l-Bahá Abbas (1844-1921), eldest son of Bahá’í founder … Continue reading

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Newly Discovered Diary Tells of Building the Transcontinental Telegraph

The transcontinental telegraph was a remarkable technological feat that had major consequences for the West and the nation as a whole. Yet relatively little has been written about it. Historians Dennis N. Mihelich and James E. Potter have edited First … Continue reading

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Dan Desdunes and the Birth of Omaha Jazz

A 1924 event in Wilber, Nebraska, featured “Dan Desdune’s Band and Minstrel Show of Omaha. Colored Entertainers Supreme.” NSHS RG813-445 (at left). Dan Desdunes lived a remarkable life as a bandleader, educator, and civil rights activist. In his native New … Continue reading

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The Military Career of Butler B. Miltonberger

Born in North Platte in 1897, Butler B. Miltonberger began his military service as a private in June of 1916, when the National Guard was mobilized during the Mexican border dispute. During World War I, Miltonberger fought with the 4th … Continue reading

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What Are Legitimate Features of the Fair?

The Flying Millers performed September 3, 1924, at the Nebraska State Fair. NSHS RG3356.PH:22-17 (at left). Sideshows have become institutions at most fairs–it just wouldn’t seem like the fair without “the amazing two-headed calf.” More than 125 years ago, when … Continue reading

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For Whom The Bell Tolls

In the early 1900s, this bell was used on a homestead in Otoe County to call farmhands to meals. In the 1920s, it was used by WJAG radio announcer, and future Nebraska Senator, Karl Stefan to add sound effects to … Continue reading

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