Monthly Archives: March 2014

Cigarettes in the Boudoir: Omaha’s Female Smokers in 1889

“From London comes the assurance that the duchess of Marlborough has introduced cigarette smoking in the charmed circle of her select friends,” said the Omaha Bee on October 27, 1889. The Bee went on to inform its readers that the … Continue reading

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Buffalo Bones Once Plentiful on Nebraska Prairie

The slaughter of the buffalo left the prairie marked by millions of tons of their bones, the skeletal remains of an entire species. Settlers wanting to augment their meager cash incomes sometimes collected and sold these bones, which were usually … Continue reading

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The Changing Image of George Armstrong Custer

Lt. Col. George Custer was once considered “the model of a Christian warrior.” In the 1870s, poets called him heroic, splendid and glorious. One magazine editor called him “chief among our nation’s knights,” and in popular opinion Custer was a … Continue reading

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No Irish Babies Born in Nebraska in 1912

When the Nebraska State Board of Health released statistics in December 1912 on various aspects of life in this state, it probably didn’t expect to provoke any controversy. However, the Omaha Daily News on December 25, under the headline “No … Continue reading

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Beauty at the Keyboard

With the advent of the typewriter in the late 1800s, women came forward to apply for and receive employment as typists, eventually replacing male clerical workers. Some acquired the new skill by enrolling in a business school that specialized in … Continue reading

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Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Robinson, Nebraska

In the racially segregated military that followed the Civil War, one of the first Cavalry regiments for black soldiers was headquartered in Nebraska for more than a decade. These soldiers played a notable role in social and military changes of … Continue reading

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How High Is That Drift?

The four men standing between snow banks in Fairbury in 1912 illustrate the aftermath of a snowstorm described by the Fairbury Journal on March 1 as “about the heaviest ever experienced in this vicinity.” The first man in line is … Continue reading

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Crazy Horse’s Sacred Bundle Buried In Minatare Nebraska

The medicine bundle of Oglala Lakota leader Crazy Horse is six feet deep somewhere in Minatare, Nebraska. A medicine bundle was a package that contained a man’s most sacred things – perhaps special stones, herbs, beads, or hair. The bundles … Continue reading

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Nebraska Statehood Launched in Troubled Times

On March 1, 1867, President Andrew Johnson reluctantly signed the proclamation declaring Nebraska’s statehood. The signing ended the life of a territory which thirteen years earlier had been organized amid controversy.  The quarrels at both the beginning and the end … Continue reading

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