Monthly Archives: September 2014

She Didn’t Know She Was a Statue

Lucy Vander Sterre’s face was used as a model for a prominent statue in Omaha. But she didn’t know the statue existed for more than 30 years. In the Fall 2014 issue of Nebraska History, you can read about the … Continue reading

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Omaha’s “Tragedy of Winter Quarters” Monument

More than 600 Mormon pioneers died in their Nebraska encampment during the winters of 1846-47 and 1847-48. The camp, called Winter Quarters, is the site of a monument in the Florence neighborhood of Omaha, commemorating their deaths through the sculpture … Continue reading

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Celebrating the Pilgrims, 1620-1920

The 300th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ landing at the future site of Plymouth, Massachusetts, in December 1620 was widely celebrated in 1920 in the United States and Great Britain. In the U.S. three commemorative stamps and a special tercentenary fifty-cent … Continue reading

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Memorial Stadium’s Roots in World War I

Memorial Stadium on the University of Nebraska campus in Lincoln is the center of the state’s attention during the Huskers’ home football games. It was built to commemorate the men and women who served in World War I, which began … Continue reading

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The Prohibition Party’s 1920 Dream Ticket: W. J. Bryan and Billy Sunday

Prohibition was the law of the land by 1920, but the Prohibition Party was still uneasy. As the presidential campaign season got underway, they feared that neither a Republican nor a Democratic president could be trusted to vigorously enforce the … Continue reading

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Selling the “‘Eat Out’ Idea” in the 1950s

American consumers today spend less of their disposable income on food than those in past decades, but statistics indicate that many of these dollars are spent for foods consumed away from home. Active marketing campaigns on behalf of the burgeoning … Continue reading

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Brown County’s Sod High School

During the Depression years of the 1930s, Nebraskans were faced with a shortage of funds for school construction. Due to the lack of available wood in many areas of the state, early settlers had constructed some buildings of sod, abundant … Continue reading

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The Nebraska History Museum’s Last Tour

Last week, two of the Nebraska History Museum’s docents made a bit of history. As they each led a group of elementary school students through exhibits focused on the First Nebraskans and Building the State, they gave the very last school … Continue reading

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Ann Lowe and the Intriguing Couture Tradition of Ak-Sar-Ben

How could such a prominent fashion designer remain so unknown to the public? Ann Lowe’s fairytale-like gowns appeared in magazines, at the Academy Awards, and were worn by Jacqueline Bouvier and her bridal party when she married John F. Kennedy … Continue reading

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Kester Planing Mill listed on the National Register

The Kester Planing Mill in Neligh has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places as of July 28, 2014. Commonly called the Neligh Planing Mill, it is a fully equipped millwork shop dating to 1911-1912, complete with period … Continue reading

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