Category Archives: Flashback Friday

Flashback Friday: A Day in the Life of Downtown Omaha

By: David Bristow For many years, Sixteenth Street was downtown Omaha’s main street. Tenth Street and the riverfront have become more prominent in recent years. (The riverfront used to be an industrial zone, as shown in this 1934 photo.) In … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: Frederick Douglass’s Nebraska Sister

 By: David Bristow Frederick Douglass is remembered for his escape from slavery and for his speeches and autobiographies through which he advocated passionately for freedom and civil rights. But he wasn’t associated with Nebraska history… until a few years ago. … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday | Tagged | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: Miles, Mules, and Men: The Forgotten Front of the Civil War

By: David Bristow Imagine your car. Now consider the amount of gas that it requires to keep it running. Picture that your car is in the middle of rural, untamed Nebraska: there are no gas stations for miles. Multiply your … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday | Tagged | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: What’s more ghoulish than a historic mask of a long-dead celebrity?

  Any mask of a long-dead celebrity with wrinkles, tears, missing ears, or discoloration – or at least that’s how the conservators at the NSHS’s Ford Conservation Center feel. “The large spots of discolored adhesive make it look like he … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: Historic Soddies as Modern Dwellings

Can you imagine living in a sod house—not as a pioneer, but as a modern person? Some people do, and some e pioneer-era soddies survive as modern dwellings. Most of our fieldwork on historic sod buildings is concerned with redundant … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Late 19th Century Divorces in Seward County Claim Adultery, Cruelty, and Name-Calling

On April 19, 1890 Maggie Devore filed a petition for divorce from her husband James Devore, initiating what proved to be among the most complex divorce procedures in Seward County. Maggie charged James with extreme cruelty, accusing him of striking … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday, Nebraska History | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: The Fight Over Nebraska’s State Seal and Flag

By James E. Potter A 2015 poll conducted by the North American Vexillogical Association (NAVA) ranked Nebraska’s state flag dead last out of all fifty states. It is little consolation that the Montana flag came in forty-ninth, the Kansas flag … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday, Nebraska History | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: Rifle of Cowboy and Gunslinger Mike Shonsey Donated to Nebraska History Museum

The last surviving participant in Wyoming’s 1892 Johnson County “cattle war” was Mike Shonsey, who later died in Clarks, Nebraska. When Shonsey was a child, he moved from Montreal, Canada to Caledonia, Ohio with his parents. This is how Shonsey … Continue reading

Posted in Flashback Friday, Nebraska History, Nebraska History News | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: How Long Will a Sod House Stand?

There are numerous reasons why the Nebraska State Historical Society is interested in recording standing sod houses, beyond the fact they are historical artifacts rapidly disappearing from the landscape (See our earlier blog about this here). In addition to adding … Continue reading

Posted in Archeology, Flashback Friday, Historic Preservation | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Flashback Friday: Early 20th Century Letters to Santa from Pleasant Hill School in Keith County

The NSHS Archives holds a collection relating to the Maunder family from Hastings, Nebraska. The bulk of the collection consists of diaries kept by Edith Maunder and two of her daughters, Vera Maunder and Ellen Maunder Ritchey. While the collection … Continue reading

Posted in Collections, Flashback Friday, Manuscript collections | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment